Visit to Latour-Marliac

Whilst on my summer holidays in the South of France last month, I made a short excursion to the famous Water Lily Gardens in Le Temple-sur-Lot.

The site has been an active nursery since 1875. Founded originally by Joseph Bory Latour-Marliac, an expert on bamboo (hence the varieties Phyllostachys nigra ‘Boryana’ and P. bambusoides ‘Marliac’) the nursery continues to cultivate over 200 varieties of water lily. Remarkable considering when Latour-Marliac started hybridising there was only one white hardy species in Europe.

The are 65 cultivation pools each containing 10 compartments holding a total of more than 200 varieties

After exhibiting his new collection in Paris in 1889 (alongside the recently completed Eiffel Tower), Latour-Marliac won an award and most importantly, the attention of Claude Monet.

Terra cotta pots used for multiplying and maintaining water lilies have stood on the edges of the ponds for over 135 years.

Latour-Marliac went on to supply the water lilies for Monet’s water garden at Giverny, which subsequently became the subject of his world-famous series of paintings.

Japanese bridge arching over the pond; a nod to Claude Monet’s at Giverny.

A particularly gorgeous species: Nymphaea ‘James Hudson’

Overall it was a great day out, a trip to Giverny is definitely next on the list!

The nursery and water garden at Latour-Marliac are well worth a visit: click here for more info

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Supports & tying in!

Having suffered my usual spring bad back week, I was under strict instructions to do very little in the garden! This time of year, and the sun shinning…. Impossible! So here are my not too strenuous hints and tips to enhance and prolong flowering this year.

Plants are growing at a phenomenal rate, especially after such a cold wet spring. No sooner than I secure a plant to its support, ten minutes later it is hanging forlornly, looking dangerously fragile again!

Clematis

So often I only notice Clematis in July and August when they have collapsed and smothered other herbaceous plants, so now is the time to support. If you are growing one up a wall, try pulling the growth more on the horizontal (gently, Clematis snap very easily). A plant will always reach for the sun; so the more laterals you create the greater the display of flowers. If you have a wide obelisk try and guide the plant in a spiral growing pattern, again creating more lateral growth.

Herbaceous Clematis

These still need some support; growing them through a mesh works well, which needs to be placed just as the clematis is pushing through the soil (April).

Peonies

Renowned for their stunning large heads, these traditional cottage garden flowers benefit from support. Initially they look superb, but once a heavy May shower has drenched them that stunning display will face the ground. Place the support on the sunny side to keep foliage off plants growing underneath.

Wisteria

If you are training a new Wisteria, now is the time to keep an eye on it. New shoots are thrown out, which need tying in as soon as possible. Laterals are the key; this way you create a good skeletal structure for the racemes of flowers to hang from.

Tall herbaceous perennials

One of my Campanulas is particularly tall; another offender is Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’, which produces beautiful tropical like red flowers; but both these two can collapse on the rest of the border. There are many others, so it is worth taking photographs later in the year to help remind you whom the main culprits are.

Roses

With RHS Chelsea on the horizon I am sure many of you will be thinking of roses. Ramblers will be growing at great speed, so keep an eye on the new growth and tie these in before they snap, remember these beautiful long shoots will be next years flowers.

I find flexi tie the best for securing and tying in, it doesn’t impede the plants growth, or cut into it, and as a bonus can be used the following year!

I buy my supports from GAP, they are good value and always very helpful.

Visit to Northumberland

For many years now it has been somewhat of a family tradition of ours to have a short break somewhere in the UK on August bank holiday weekend. This year was no exception and we spent a wonderful few days in sunny Northumberland.

A day trip to Alnwick Garden was both inspiring and nostalgic for me as it was during my first visit here, nine years ago, that I was inspired to get into the world of horticulture. This time round I particularly enjoyed the stunning display of mature Hydrangeas in the Ornamental Garden and seeing the swinging seats en masse in the Cherry Orchard.

I bet the hillside Cherry Orchard looks absolutely stunning in spring.

The hillside Cherry Orchard must look absolutely stunning in spring.

Alnwick Castle was also a site to behold, and though my family may have been enthralled by the fact that it was a ‘Harry Potter’ filming location I was much more interested in its setting. The landscape, of course, was designed by local Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown, a friend of the 1st Duke of Northumberland.

View of the 'Capability Landscape' from the castle wall.

View of the ‘Capability Landscape’ from the castle wall.

Another of the trip’s highlights was stumbling across Gertrude Jekyll’s Walled Garden at Lindisfarne Castle on Holy Island. Having done no research before the visit I was pleasantly surprised to see a floriferous display in such an isolated and exposed location. Unsurprisingly Jekyll’s design has stood the test of time; the hardy annuals and perennials are mapped out to her original plan giving a sense of stepping back in time.

Lindisfarne Castle from the walled garden.

Lindisfarne Castle from the walled garden.

 

Gertrude Jekyll's planting plan 1906-1912.

Gertrude Jekyll’s planting plan 1906-1912.

Finally, the weekend was rounded off with several walks along the beach, a perfect way to experience Northumberland’s breathtaking coastline.

Stunning coastline featuring Dunstanburgh Castle.

Stunning coastline featuring Dunstanburgh Castle.

Colours of the Rainbow at Belvoir Castle

This is my equivalent to fireworks night! and why I love my job.

For six months of the year we go to work on cold, misty and gloomy days;
We slip down steep boggy slopes in the pouring rain,
Shake heavy snow off conifers, with flakes falling down our necks;
Fight thorny battles tying in stubborn roses: 40’ up castle walls!
Wrestle brambles deeply rooted at the bottom of Rhody’s
Re-stake Plants blown over in hurricane winds……

and why do we do all of this: because of these…

_4150905

_4150975

_4160020

_4160187

_4160189

_4160197

_4160218

_4160223

Garden fireworks at Belvoir!

How I love this time of year. After months of cold and gloom, suddenly it is like a firework display with colours exploding in all directions. We visit Belvoir every two weeks and the difference is incredible.

Following on from our visit to the Magnolia Holy Grail last week I think we are holding our own at Belvoir, just look at this one called Caerhays surprise. He has 15 flowers this year so is doing well considering he was only planted in 2012.

_4150516
On Monday morning our lawn at home was white over and I needed the ice scraper to clear my windscreen, so I feared the worst. for the Camelias. But luckily they weren’t caught and are looking their best.

This Camellia is about 15ft high!

This Camellia is about 15ft high!

 

We have yet to identify this Rhody - that will be next years job! We are still finishing identifying all the trees at the moment!

We have yet to identify this Rhody – that will be next years job! We are still finishing identifying all the trees at the moment!

 

The Great White Cherry (Prunus Tai Haku) looks stunning against the deep blue sky.

The Great White Cherry (Prunus Tai Haku) looks stunning against the deep blue sky.

 

Pieris looking superb, this is now a tree, about 15ft high.

Pieris looking superb, this is now a tree, about 15ft high.

 

Another Magnolia, a Stellata, but I am not sure which one yet. More research to do!

Another Magnolia, a Stellata, but I am not sure which one yet. More research to do!

 

 And finally a view into the Japanese woodland. New paths have just been laid, so it looks better than ever.


And finally a view into the Japanese woodland. New paths have just been laid, so it looks better than ever.

Tennis Court Transformed to a Garden

In February 2013 we started our tennis court transformation.

One of our lovely ‘regulars’ who we have now been working for for over 10 years decided his tennis days were numbered. The Tennis court needed re surfacing and he was unsure what to do; “What would we do?” my eye’s lit up and one of our most challenging projects began.

There were two stipulations; Could we transplant one of the 25 year old pleached Limes, and could we plant a Cedar Lebanon. The rest was up to us.

As the existing area was symmetrical it made sense to run with a formal theme. The pleached lime running alongside the court formed a superb division and backdrop, but one of the Limes impeded our access for heavy machinery and had to be removed.  Transplanting a 25 year old tree half buried under a tennis court seemed out of the question, but our client desperately wanted to save the tree. I didn’t think for a minute it would survive, how happy I am to be proved wrong!

The beech hedge was removed in the centre to make way for the centre isle.

The beech hedge was removed in the centre to make way for the centre isle.

The Cedar of Lebanon arriving from Italy - poor thing it was so cold here.

The Cedar of Lebanon arriving from Italy – poor thing it was so cold here.

Careful manoeuvring over the pleached Lime.

Careful manoeuvring over the pleached Lime.

 

Digging out the central beds whilst leaving hardcore in for the paths.

Digging out the central beds whilst leaving hardcore in for the paths.

Many tonnes of Top soil added to make up the levels (one of the best things we did as the soil adjacent to the house is shallow).

Marking out the paths using wood and stakes for the edges.

Marking out the paths using wood and stakes for the edges.

 

We used Everedge, steel lawn edging to create the inner circles.

We used Everedge, steel lawn edging to create the inner circles.

The final design with the Cedar centre stage.

The final design with the Cedar centre stage.

One year later.

One year later.