Posts

The Onion Conundrum: the best combinations for planting ornamental Alliums

Alliums are a great addition to a herbaceous border for many months of the year. As Piet Oudolf says “bulbs form a sort of underground army that add an extra dimension to your garden”, they can be used individually as an exclamation mark through a border or in groups creating blocks of colour. Alliums in particular have the additional bonus of not being on the squirrel, deer or rabbit menu!

Allium ‘Globemaster’ Bursting into life

Allium giganteum and A.‘Globemaster’ are real showstoppers. They have the largest heads and add great presence to a border. It is important to remember that by the time they are looking superb, their leaves beneath will look untidy and so need to be hidden. Alchemilla mollisBrunnera, and many of the Geranium family do this job perfectly.

Top tip: plant giant Alliums towards the back of a border.

Allium giganteum underplanted with Geranium. Photo credit: www.edenbrothers.com

Perfect for a white garden, Allium ‘Mount Everest’ is a tall, white Allium that benefits from a dark backdrop for example, yew hedging or evergreen topiary obelisks. I have seen these used to great effect in clumps in the new herbaceous borders at RBG Kew. Again you need to consider the unsightly leaves at the base of the plant.

Planting companions: white lavender, Dicentra (Lamprocapnos) spectabilis ‘Alba’, Astrantia ‘Superstar’, Hellebores & any of the larger white Geraniums.

RBG Kew: Allium ‘Mount Everest’ planted en masse on ‘The Broadwalk’ May 2018

The ‘Drumstick’ Allium, A. sphaerocephalon, has lovely little egg-shaped flower heads in early summer and looks great in a prairie-style planting scheme. Plant it en masse with feather grass Stipa tenuissima and Achillea ‘Terracotta’ for ultimate movement in your garden.

Prairie-style: Stipa tenuissima, Achillea ‘Terracotta’ and Allium sphaerocephalon

Finally, Allium atropurpureum usually grown for it’s rich, deep purple, star-shaped umbels matches beautifully with the dark purple stems of Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’. Planted together, the pair will give a splash of colour in the front/middle of a border from late spring into summer.

Allium atropurpureum planted amongst Monarda, Amsonia & Salvia. Photo credit: www.gardeninacity.wordpress.com

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Thinking outside the box…

Earlier this year, to our dismay, we discovered an outbreak of the dreaded ‘box blight’ at one of our regular clients gardens. Sadly the symptoms of the fungal infection were abundant in a parterre; designed and planted over 25 years ago!

pink-flowers-hedge

Before the blight…

After long deliberations it was decided that one half of the mirror-image parterre (the badly affected side) would have to be dug up and destroyed to prevent spread of the disease to the rest of the garden. The other half however (exhibiting only minor patches of dieback) could potentially be saved through a careful treatment and feeding programme.

This provided us with a unique design opportunity; instead of replicating the existing arrangement with a box alternative and waiting another 25 years for it to look “as good”, we decided to literally ‘think outside the box’.

DSC02580

The plan: existing box parterre to the right, new oregano planting to the left.

A new planting design was based on the negative imprint of the original plan, whereby the hedges became paths and the gaps became planting. The design was planted with Origanum vulgare ‘Aureum’ (100 plants exactly) to create both height and colour contrast.

20170421_095558

Before…

 

20170421_110945

Marking out…

 

20170421_112750

Planting calculations turned out perfect!

 

DSC02579

The finished product- can’t wait for the oregano to fill out the design!

From design table to coffee table

Spring is always our fun time of year,  completing gardens that were on the design table last year.

This courtyard garden was a lovely task. Set within a magnificent old coach house built when Cromwell was around! The shape of the area lent itself to a formal concept, with some ebullient planting to add colour and height, giving the impression of greater space.

_4200721

This was our first project  done following a design from CAD.

Master Plan Detail

With no access for small machinery, the project was labour intensive. First the beds were marked out to show which cobbles needed removing and which frost damaged bricks needed replacing.

IMG_9418

New soil was brought in and the beds were left to settle for a couple of months

_4200721

The fun part…. Martin placing the Obelisks and reorganising the existing beds which already had a great colour scheme and plenty of choice plants.

_4200740

All hands on deck …..
_4200742

And finally …

_4200750